Save the Kimberley

We are an joining forces here working to educate the public and support community in protecting the unique environment and culture of the Kimberley. The Kimberley is one of the world’s last great wilderness areas and deserves real protection.

The Kimberley is currently under threat with a range of short-sighted industrial proposals threatening the sustainable tourism, Indigenous land management and pastoral future of the region. Most pressing is a proposal to build a massive LNG processing plant at James Price Point (JPP) 50km North of Broome.
The Kimberley Coast would suffer irreparable damage both environmentally and culturally under such a proposal with all its associated industrial impacts including shipping traffic, reef blasting, dredging and pollution – all in the breeding and nursery area for the worlds largest remaining population of Humpback whales.
The State Government has initiated compulsory acquisition of Indigenous land at James Price Point for the Woodside lead project in a move that has met with outrage across Australia and the world. Meanwhile the joint venture partners Shell, Chevron, BP and BHP continue to have reservations understanding that THERE ARE ALTERNATIVES – Browse basin gas could be:
1. Left in the ground, or
2. Piped to the Pilbara where there is established industrial infastructure, or
3. Processed via offshore floating technology under development.

Save the Kimberley does not oppose development. Save the Kimberley supports appropriate development that looks after people and the environment of the Kimberley.

THERE IS NO NEED TO PUT THE PRISTINE KIMBERLEY COAST AT RISK

See the protest today, latest media coverage – http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2011/07/05/3261383.htm?site=perth
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/

Search youtube or here is a clip from Tuesday –
 www.youtube.com/watch?v=r34uDl8EqCY&feature=player_embedded#at=14 7th July James Price Point blockade.wmv

Save the Kimberley groups
Send letters from the site http://www.savethekimberley.com/
http://www.givenow.com.au/savethekimberley

http://www.environskimberley.org.au/

Get Up Grass Roots Action For Australia – 
Vote for our cause to get assistance from this group that gets results – http://suggest.getup.org.au/forums/60819-getup-campaign-suggestions/suggestions/1896595-stopping-proposed-gas-refinery-at-james-price-poin

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/

[-0-] CELEBRATING BLAK HISTORY MONTH

Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are advised this article may contain images and references to the deceased. 

#4 July 2011

Magabala Books

In September 1984 a traditional song and dance festival was held at Ngumpan, near Fitzroy Crossing in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. It was attended by more than two hundred people from communities throughout the region. The meeting voted for the establishment of a Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre (KALACC). This meeting developed three main aims of KALACC and it was the third aim “Providing protection to traditional storytellers and artists in matters of copyright and publication”, that led to the establishment of Magabala Books. 

Releasing its first title in 1987, Mayi – Some Bushfruits of the West Kimberley by Merrilee Lands it was followed by Wandering Girl, an autobiography by Glenyse Ward. This book sold out within ten days of the launch and continued to be a bestseller for over a decade. Both were milestone moments for the publisher that has since released over one hundred titles from a range of genres and publishing books by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from all over Australia. 

Magabala is the Nyul Nyul, Nyangumarta, Karrajari and Yawuru traditional language word for the bush banana found on the west Kimberley coast. As the fruit hardens and dries, it prepares for the dispersal of its many seeds with their spectacular parasol-shaped aerofoils. Magabala Books views it’s publishing in much the same way, by spreading the seeds of culture. 

Based in Broome, Western Australia, Magabala Books is one of the remotest publishing houses in the world. It is also the oldest independent Indigenous publishing house in Australia. 

Would you like to read more about this Great Moment in Blakistory …
· http://www.magabalabooks.com/

Source: Sam Cook

[-0-] CELEBRATING BLAK HISTORY MONTH

Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are advised this article may contain images and references to the deceased. 

#5 July 2011

Damian Smith

Damian Smith, (1973 – ) Born New South Wales, Damian was raised in government housing by a widowed, single mother in the Industrial city of Newcastle. As one of six children, his interest in performance came through chance when at the age of ten, his mother was given tickets to the ballet. It was here that his love began. His natural ability was impressive and under the tutelage of Robin Hicks, he began to train free of charge. Being teased and bullied did not deter him and it was not long before he received a scholarship to perform at the McDonald College School of Arts, creating a safe space to explore and hone his craft with likeminded peers. 

With a dream to have lessons with Baryshnikov, Damian was supported to attend and audition for the School of American Ballet. On the strength of his first audition, he was signed up and began his international pathway through the arts. He was almost 17. 

After dancing with Ballet du Nord, he joined San Francisco Ballet in 1996. He was promoted to soloist in 1998 and to principal dancer in 2001 at the age of 27. Preparing for his inevitable retirement, Damian returned to Australia to present International Stars of Ballet in Noosa, Queensland. Through his remarkable journey hopes to be seen as a role model for Indigenous children.

Would you like to read more about this Great Moment in Blakistory …
· http://www.sfballet.org/about/company/dancers/view.asp?id=12340020
· http://www.abc.net.au/tv/messagestick/stories/s3064647.htm

Source: Sam Cook

[-0-] CELEBRATING BLAK HISTORY MONTH

Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are advised this article may contain images and references to the deceased. 

#3 July 2011

Torres Strait Islander Railway Workers

The modernization of Australia and its foundation of vital mining and economic pathways, owes a significant debt to the blood, sweat and song Torres Strait Islander community. Officially permitted to travel to mainland Australia in 1947 Torres Strait Islander workers were primarily sought to fill the labour shortage in the agricultural industry. In the 1960s, many men, moved to the mainland to support their families. It was here they found employment building railways to mines in Mount Isa and Weipa in Queensland, and in the Pilbara and Port Hedland regions of Western Australia. 

The work was tough and so was being away from family and country. Some Torres Strait Islanders would never return to their homelands. One of the noted rail gangs was led by Father Elemo Tapim. Comprised mostly of Eastern Torres Strait Islanders, they began work constructing the massive Queensland and Western Australian inland rail system. In doing this they documented every mile in a remarkable collection of songs in the Meriam language. The songs created by the Eastern Torres Strait Islanders also act as a roadmap for future generations – figuratively and literally inadvertently mapping the tracklines from outback Queensland and remote Western Australia in song.

To this day, one Torres Strait Islander railroad gang holds the world record for laying track by hand. On the 8 May 1968 they laid 7¼ miles of track in 12 hours. This took 910 tons of rail and 13,000 sleepers. 

Would you like to read more about this Great Moment in Blakistory …
· http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2007/05/23/1930521.htm
· http://railwaysongs.blogspot.com/2009/02/torres.html
· http://aso.gov.au/titles/documentaries/island-fettlers/clip2/?nojs

Source: Sam Cook

[-0-] CELEBRATING BLAK HISTORY MONTH

Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are advised this article may contain images and references to the deceased. 

#2 July 2011

Freda Glynn

Freda Glynn spent her early childhood in and around Alice Springs in the Northern Territory. She was one of forty children to be evacuated from Alice Springs during World War Two following Japanese advances into the Pacific, particularly the bombing of Darwin and Katharine. With her mother and sister, she travelled via Melbourne to a Church Missionary Society evacuee camp in the Blue Mountains. 

In 1980, with John Macumba and Philip Batty, Freda Glynn co-founded the Central Australian Aboriginal Media Association Group of Companies (CAAMA). CAAMA incorporates Imparja, the first Aboriginal commercial television station, which commenced broadcasting in 1988 in Alice Springs and was chaired by Glynn for a time. Imparja was responsible for broadcasting Urrpeye, an Aboriginal current affairs program. Freda Glynn also established the first licensed Aboriginal radio station, Radio 8KIN FM, broadcasting in regional languages. 

In 2002, she played Grandma Nina in the short film Shit Skin, a drama about a young man who takes his grandmother back to the place of her childhood so that she can reconnect with her surviving family. In May 2002, Glynn received the Award for Contribution to Indigenous Media at the Third Tudawali Indigenous Film and Video Awards held at the Sydney Opera House.

Would you like to read more about this Great Moment in Blakistory …
· http://www.womenaustralia.info/exhib/cal/glynn.html
· http://www.abc.net.au/rn/talks/8.30/mediarpt/stories/s898147.htm
· http://homepage.mac.com/will_owen/iblog/C570458628/E20060217214941/index.html
Source: Sam Cook

July [-0-] CELEBRATING BLAK HISTORY MONTH

Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are advised this article may contain images and references to the deceased.

#1 July 2011

Australian Aborigines Progressive Association

The Australian Aborigines Progressive Association (AAPA) – Originally formed in 1924 by Fred Maynard, a prolific member of the Australian Chapter of the Colored Progressive Association (1903-08). The AAPA was launched in April 1925 with a conference at St David’s Hall in Surry Hills NSW. It operated out of Addison’s Hall at 460 Crown Street, Surry Hills.

The AAPA held four major landmark conferences, amongst the many other undertakings Their activities culminated in a petition addressed to Jack Lang, the Premier of New South Wales, in May 1927, which called for the restitution of Aboriginal land. Their members had also written an appeal to King George V, which contested the power of the Aborigines Protection Board to withdraw Aboriginal control of reserves on the grounds that they had been granted by Queen Victoria.

The association grew to have eleven branches throughout New South Wales and over 500 active members. However the broad reach and vocal approach of the organisation alerted the Aborigines Protection Board to the threat that it posed. They set about a campaign to discredit the leaders of the association, attacking the credibility of Fred Maynard through a series of public statements. The association was also subject to frequent police harassment. Due to this harassment, by the end of 1927, the AAPA had been dissolved.

Today, the Australian Aborigines Progressive Association is recognised as the first United politically organised Aboriginal activist group in Australia.

Would you like to read more about this Great Moment in Blakistory …
· http://www.dictionaryofsydney.org/entry/australian_aborigines_progressive_association
· asset0.aiatsis.gov.au:1801/webclient/DeliveryManager?&pid=18787

The Barunga Statement

Attachment A – The Barunga Statement
We, the Indigenous owners and occupiers of Australia, call on the Australian Government and people to recognise our rights:
to self-determination and self-management, including the freedom to pursue our own economic, social, religious and cultural development;
to permanent control and enjoyment of our ancestral lands;
to compensation for the loss of use of our lands, there having been no extinction of original title;
to protection of and control of access to our sacred sites, sacred objects, artefacts, designs, knowledge and works of art;
to the return of the remains of our ancestors for burial in accordance with our traditions;
to respect for and promotion of our Aboriginal identity, including the cultural, linguistic, religious and historical aspects, and including the right to be educated in our own languages and in our own culture and history;
in accordance with the universal declaration of human rights, the international covenant on economic, social and cultural rights, the international covenant on civil and political rights, and the international convention on the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination, rights to life, liberty, security of person, food, clothing, housing, medical care, education and employment opportunities, necessary social services and other basic rights.
We call on the Commonwealth to pass laws providing:
A national elected Aboriginal and Islander organisation to oversee Aboriginal and Islander affairs;
A national system of land rights;
A police and justice system which recognises our customary laws and frees us from discrimination and any activity which may threaten our identity or security, interfere with our freedom of expression or association, or otherwise prevent our full enjoyment and exercise of universally recognised human rights and fundamental freedoms.
We call on the Australian Government to support Aborigines in the development of an international declaration of principles for indigenous rights, leading to an international covenant.
And we call on the Commonwealth Parliament to negotiate with us a Treaty recognising our prior ownership, continued occupation and sovereignty and affirming our human rights and freedom.

Attachment B – Statement of Reconciliation
Learning from the Past As Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians seek to move forward together in a process of renewal, it is essential that we deal with the legacies of the past affecting the Aboriginal peoples of Canada, including the First Nations, Inuit and MÚtis. Our purpose is not to rewrite history but, rather, to learn from our past and to find ways to deal with the negative impacts that certain historical decisions continue to have in our society today.
The ancestors of the First Nations, Inuit and MÚtis peoples lived on this continent long before explorers from other continents first came to North America. For thousands of years before this country was founded, they enjoyed their own forms of government. Diverse, vibrant Aboriginal nations had ways of life rooted in fundamental values concerning their relationship to the Creator, the environment, and each other, in the role of Elders as the living memory of their ancestors, and in their responsibilities as custodians of the lands, waters and resources of their homelands.
The assistance and spiritual values of the Aboriginal peoples who welcomed the newcomers to this continent too often have been forgotten. The contributions made by all Aboriginal peoples to Canada’s development, and the contributions they continue to make to our society today, have not been properly acknowledged. The Government of Canada today, on behalf of all Canadians, acknowledges those contributions.
Sadly, our history with respect to the treatment of Aboriginal people is not something in which we can take pride. Attitudes of racial and cultural superiority led to a suppression of Aboriginal culture and values. As a country we are burdened by past actions that resulted in weakening the identity of Aboriginal peoples, suppressing their languages and cultures and outlawing spiritual practices. We must recognise the impact of these actions on the once self-sustaining nations that were disaggregated, disrupted, limited or even destroyed by the dispossession of traditional territory, by the relocation of self-sustaining nations that were desegregated, disrupted, limited or even destroyed by the dispossession of traditional territory, by the relocation of Aboriginal people, and by some provisions f the Indian Act. We must acknowledge that the result of these actions was the erosion of the political, economic and social systems of Aboriginal people and nations.
Against the backdrop of these historical legacies, it is a remarkable tribute to the strength and endurance of Aboriginal people that they have maintained their historic diversity and identity. The Government of Canada today formally expresses to all Aboriginal people in Canada our profound regret for past actions of the federal government which have contributed to these difficult pages in the history of our relationship together.
One aspect of our relationship with Aboriginal people over this period that required particular attention is the Residential School system. This system separated many children from their families and communities and prevented them from speaking their own languages and from learning about their heritage and cultures. In the worst cases, it left legacies of personal pain and distress that continue to reverberate in Aboriginal communities to this day. Tragically, some children were the victims of physical and sexual abuse.
The Government of Canada acknowledges the role it played in the development and administration of these schools. Particularly to those individuals who experienced the tragedy of sexual and physical abuse at residential schools, and who have carried this burden believing that in some way they must be responsible, we wish to emphasize that what you experienced was not your fault and should never have happened. To those of you who suffered this tragedy at residential schools, we are deeply sorry.
In dealing with the legacies of the Residential School system, the Government of Canada proposes to work with First Nations, Inuit and MÚtis people, the Churches and other interested parties to resolve the outstanding issues that must be addressed. We need to work together on a healing strategy to assist individuals and communities in dealing with the consequences of this sad era in our history.
No attempt at reconciliation with Aboriginal people can be complete without reference to the sad events culminating in the death of MÚtis leader Louis Riel. These events cannot be undone: however, we can and will continue to look for ways of affirming the contributions of MÚtis people in Canada and of reflecting Louis Riel’s proper place in Canada’s history.
Reconciliation is an ongoing process. In renewing our partnership, we must ensure that the mistakes which marked our past relationship are not repeated. The Government of Canada recognizes that policies that sought to assimilate Aboriginal people, women and men, were not the way to build a strong country.
We must instead continue to find ways in which Aboriginal people can participate fully in the economic, political, cultural and social life of Canada in a manner which preserves and enhances the collective identities of Aboriginal communities, and allows them to evolve and flourish in the future. Working together to achieve our shared goals will benefit all Canadians, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal alike.
On behalf of the Government of Canada
The Honourable Jane Stewart, P.C, M.P. Minister for Indian Affairs and Northern Development.
The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P. Federal Interlocutor for MÚtis and Non-Status Indians.

Attachment C – Preamble to the Constitution of South Africa
We, the people of South Africa,Recognise the injustices of our past; Honour those who suffered for justice and freedom in our land; Respect those who have worked to build and develop our country; and Believe that South Africa belongs to all who live in it, united in our diversity.We therefore, through our freely elected representatives, adopt this constitution as the supreme law of the Republic so as to – Heal the divisions of the past and establish a society based on democratic values, social justice and fundamental human rights; Lay the foundations for a democratic and open society in which government is based on the will of the people and every citizen is equally protected by law;Improve the quality of life of all citizens and free the potential of each person;and Build a united and democratic South Africa able to take its rightful place as a sovereign state in the family of nations. May God protect our people. Nkosi Sikelel’iAfrika. Morena boloka setjhaba sa heso. God seen Suid Afrika. God bless South Africa. Mudzimu fhatutshedza Afurika. Hosi Katekisa Afrika.